{ DESPORTO COMUNITÁRIO } Frank Cunha III sétimo em ultra-maratona

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Frank Cunha III, arquitecto luso-americano nascido em Newark, alcançou, no sábado e domingo passados, o sétimo lugar dos 50 quilómetros da ultra-maratona denominada NJ Trail Series 50K Ultra Race com o tempo de 4 horas, 59 minutos, e 18 segundos, a sua primeira — e mais longa — prova do género.
+++ PARA SABER MAIS, COMPRE A EDIÇÃO DE SEXTA-FEIRA, 28 de MARÇO, 2014 DO JORNAL LUSO-AMERICANO
http://www.luso.americano.com

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Posted in Fitness, Run, Ultra

My First Time @njtrailseries

First Ultra 50K 03-22-2014 -05 First Ultra 50K 03-22-2014 -04 First Ultra 50K 03-22-2014 -03 First Ultra 50K 03-22-2014 -02 First Ultra 50K 03-22-2014 -01

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Posted in Run, Ultra

MY FIRST 50K RUN – TAPER PLAN (MARCH 2014)

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Taper Plan for My First 50K Run

__     SATURDAY        

  • AM – RUN 10 MILES LAST LONG RUN – MODERATE (SPARTA RUNNERS)
  • PM- REST

__     SUNDAY

  • AM – RUN 1 MILE EASY / STRETCH
  • PM- REST

__     MONDAY

  • AM – SWIM – 30 MIN. EASY
  • AM – BIKE – 30 MIN. EASY
  • AM – RUN 5 MILES / INTERVALS – 4 MIN RUN / 1 MIN WALK – MODERATE
  • PM- REST

__     TUESDAY

  • AM – YOGA
  • PM – RUN 5 MILES EASY (SALT SHAKERS)

__     WEDNESDAY     AM – RUN 5 MILES / INTERVALS – 4 MIN RUN / 1 MIN WALK – EASY

  • PM – SWIM – 30 MIN. EASY

__     THURSDAY

  • AM – RUN 1 MILE EASY
  • AM – YOGA
  • PM- REST

__     FRIDAY

  • AM – SWIM – 30 MIN. EASY
  • AM – BIKE – 30 MIN. EASY
  • AM – 1 RUN MILE EASY / STRETCH
  • PM- REST

__     SATURDAY

  • RUN 31 MILES

__     SUNDAY

  • R&R = REST & RECOVER

__     MONDAY

  • R&R = REST & RECOVER
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MY FIRST 50K ULTRA RUN – TRAINING PLAN

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My First 50K


50K Race 01

Click for more info

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Posted in Fitness, Run, Ultra

Back-to-Back Long Runs

Back-to-Back Long Runs

Piggybacking long runs has proven effective for ultrarunners racing 50K and beyond. It mimics ultra race-day fatigue but allows for a night’s recovery between sessions. Do a steady long run one day followed by a fast finish long run the next. This is especially challenging because you will be running hard the second day on fatigued legs.

Do back-to-back long runs once a week. Estimate your time for finishing the ultra and build up to running those total hours over two days. You want to run the full distance (combining back-to-back days) at least three or four times before the race.

For example, if you think you will finish in six hours, run three hours on Saturday and three hours on Sunday. Or four hours on Saturday and two hours on Sunday. Or five hours and one hour. Mix it up.

Sunday will be painful at first, but after you get warmed up it will feel easier. A great free program to follow is the Santa Clarita Ultra Training program.

It is important to slowly progress into these workouts, especially for those inexperienced with high mileage, by starting with relatively short back-to-backs during the pre-season months and building on those as race day approaches.

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Posted in Run, Ultra

Triathletes and Competitive Swimmers: “All They Share is Water” by Terry Laughlin

Click here to watch and listen to Terry Laughlin’s thoughts on this subject.

Over 90% of age group triathletes come to the sport with no formal background in swimming. And yet the long-distance, open-water swimming you’re trying to master is as demanding as it comes.

So where do you find help for your swimming?

Many triathletes take their cues from competitive swim coaches and teams, but is that really the best approach?

Before founding Total Immersion Terry Laughlin competed as a swimmer from age 14 to 20, then spent 20 years coaching competitive swimmers–including over two dozen national champions.

For the past 25 years, Terry worked mainly with late-starting adults who want to participate in a triathlon or to reap the low-impact, heart-healthy, all-around body-toning benefits of swimming.

And in his own life and swimming, Terry committed to both: swimming for life as well as competing on a high level in Open Water events–where, since age 55, I’ve won numerous national titles myself.

Through all these varied experiences, Terry come to this conclusion:

The only thing that triathlon, open-water, and fitness swimming have in common with competitive swimming is water.

Let’s examine the differences between competitive swimmers and triathletes and open water swimmers.

Competitive (Pool) Swimmers

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Their average age is 15. By virtue of their young age, they ‘automatically’ get faster each year simply by virtue of growing taller and stronger.

They train for only one sport.

Their average race lasts just over two minutes . . . during which their goal is to swim to exhaustion.

While racing in the pool, they take fewer than 20 uninterrupted strokes before their arms get a ‘rest break’ during the turn and pushoff.

Triathlon and Open Water Swimmers

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Their average age is 45+. They need to train intelligently and resourcefully simply to hold the line on aging.

Triathletes train for three sports, not just one.

The races they swim last 40 minutes to over two hours.

A triathlete needs to finish their swim fresh enough to cycle and run strongly for many miles.

While racing in open water they typically take thousands of uninterrupted strokes with no ‘rest breaks’

When you consider these striking contrasts, it becomes clear that the triathlon or open water swimmer has virtually nothing in common with the competitive swimmer.

So, why would you want to train like them?

Click here to watch and listen to Terry Laughlin’s thoughts on this subject.

Suggested Reading:

Total Immersion by Terry Laughlin

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Posted in Swim

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